The Application Gallery features COMSOL Multiphysics tutorial and demo app files pertinent to the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. You can download ready-to-use tutorial models and demo apps with step-by-step instructions for how to create them yourself. The examples in the gallery serve as a great starting point for your own simulation work.

Use the Quick Search to find tutorials and apps relevant to your area of expertise. Log in or create a COMSOL Access account that is associated with a valid COMSOL license to download the MPH-files.


Heat Sink

This model is intended as a first introduction to simulations of fluid flow and conjugate heat transfer. It shows you how to: Draw an air box around a device in order to model convective cooling in this box, set a total heat flux on a boundary using automatic area computation, and display results in an efficient way using selections in data sets.

Optimizing a Thermal Process

A thermal processing scenario is modeled whereby two heaters raise the temperature of a gas flowing through a channel. The Optimization Module is used to find the heater power to maximize the outflow temperature, while maintaining a constraint on the peak temperature at the heaters themselves.

The Magnus Effect

The Magnus effect explains the curl that soccer players can give the ball, resulting in the enjoyable goals that we can see in every World Cup™. This model looks at the Magnus effect in the laminar and turbulent flow regimes for transient and stationary flows. It also discusses the simulation results and relates them to experimental measurements on soccer balls found in the literature.

Turbulent Flow Over a Backward Facing Step

The backward facing step is an interesting case for studying the performance and solution strategy of a turbulence model. In this case, the flow is subjected to a sudden increase of cross-sectional area, resulting in a separation of flow starting at the point of expansion. Spatial variations in the velocity field cause production of turbulence outside the wall region and its interaction with ...

Flow Through a Pipe Elbow

Water flow in a 90 degree pipe elbow. The flow is simulated using the k-omega turbulence model. The result is compared to engineering correlations.

Droplet Breakup in a T-junction

Emulsions consist of small liquid droplets immersed in an immiscible liquid and widely occur in the production of food, cosmetics, fine chemicals, and pharmaceutical products. The quality of the product is typically dependent on the size of the droplets. Simulating these processes can help in optimizing these droplets as well as other process variables. This model studies the volume mass ...

Capillary Filling - Phase Field Method

This example studies a narrow vertical cylinder placed on top of a reservoir filled with water. Because of wall adhesion and surface tension at the air/water interface, water rises through the channel. Surface tension and wall adhesive forces are often used to transport fluid through microchannels in MEMS devices or to measure, transport and position small amounts of fluid using micropipettes. ...

Inkjet Nozzle - Level Set Method

Although initially invented to be used in printers, inkjets have been adopted for other application areas, such as within the life sciences and microelectronics. Simulations can be useful to improve the understanding of the fluid flow and to predict the optimal design of an inkjet for a specific application. The purpose of this application is to adapt the shape and operation of an inkjet nozzle ...

Airflow over an Ahmed Body

The Ahmed body represents a simplified, ground vehicle geometry of a bluff body type. Its shape is simple enough to allow for accurate flow simulation but retains some important practical features relevant to automobile bodies. This model describes how to calculate the turbulent flow field around a simple car-like geometry using the Turbulent Flow, k-epsilon interface. Detailed instructions ...

Rising Bubble

The level set method is well suited for problems with moving boundaries in which the geometry’s topology changes with time. A bubble of oil that travels up through water and finally merges with oil at the top causes this kind of topology change. For problems where the topology is unchanged as a function of time, as in free surface movement in a tank (no splashing) and impeller stirring, it is ...

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